Archive

Posts Tagged ‘Execution’

Supreme Court Stops Texas Execution

September 19, 2011 Leave a comment

Death row Duane avoids gettin’ extinct-n-shit as Supreme Kikes of McAmerica decide racial reality, facts and state rights have no place in feral-federal jewstice sewer system.

 

Supreme Court Stops Texas Execution

 

Liberal lapdogs and Kikenvermin Marxists allow toe-faced tarbaby to continue its leisurely stay in taxpayer funded Super-Ape motel.

 

The Supreme Court made the rare decision to step in and order a stay of execution for Duane Edward Buck in Texas, hours before he was to die, because the jury sentencing him to death was told that Buck posed a greater threat to public safety because of his race.

The justices still must determine whether they will review the Buck case, so this stay may not last very long. But at a time when Rick Perry is running for President, it’s a significant reversal that could cause further scrutiny of the death penalty system in Texas.

“We are relieved that the U.S. Supreme Court recognized the obvious injustice of allowing a defendant’s race to factor into sentencing decisions,” his attorney, Kate Black, said in a statement.

“No one should be put to death based on the color of his or her skin,” she added.

Perry, his Lt. Governor David Dewhurst and the Texas Board of Pardons and Paroles either refused to hear the plea for clemency or recommended against it. But this is a serious constitutional issue. In 2000, the Supreme Court ruled in favor of an inmate whose death sentence was reversed because of a race-based appeal made in sentencing. John Cornyn was Attorney General at the time, and he listed six cases where prosecutors relied on race-based arguments in death penalty cases. Specifically, an expert witness testified that the African-American defendants had a greater propensity for “future dangerousness,” a consideration in Texas death penalty cases, solely because of their race. Of the six cases, five received a new sentencing hearing (those cases were pending in federal court; only Buck’s was in state court). But for some reason, Buck did not. One of the state prosecutors who worked on the case, who has now come forward to say that Buck should get a new trial, simply assumed that he already had one, based on the Cornyn order in 2000. It’s not Buck’s guilt or innocence that’s at issue, it’s this serious misconduct at trial by the prosecution.

State prosecutors won a lower court case arguing that Buck’s Constitutional rights were not violated, but his lawyers appealed up to the Supreme Court. And now they have a stay of execution while the justices review the case. This doesn’t even mean that Buck won’t still get death for the murders; in the other cases, the inmates were re-sentenced to death. But it does mean that he would get a new sentencing trial, because race-based appeals like this violate the federal Constitution.

Hanging over this is the extreme surety with which Perry touts the “very thoughtful, very clear process” for death sentencing in Texas. That’s obviously not true in this case, and hopefully this will force a reckoning from major media on other cases. Like Cameron Todd Willingham, perhaps.

 

Treasure Of The Please Spare-Em Cadre

July 9, 2011 1 comment

Island of Doctor Moreau man-monkey prez attempts to use fed jewstice system to save Meh-hee-can toilet bowl brush from fatal flush to that big sewage treatment plant in the sky, where we wish all of these  barrio bowel movements would go.
Lone star state ignores D.C.  Super spade and puts down rabid spic-bull as it cries “vive Mexico!” in all its assimilating, Die-Verse splendor…
  • This undated handout photo provided by the Texas Department of Criminal Justice shows Humberto Leal. State lawyers have told the U.S. Supreme Court that appeals to halt this week's scheduled execution of the Mexican national for the 1994 rape-slaying of a 16-year-old San Antonio girl are without merit. Leal faces lethal injection Thursday in Huntsville,Texas. (AP Photo/Texas Department of Criminal Justice)
Mestizo murderer “My way or the highway” Humberto Leal ends victim’s life with chunk of Asphalt in what must be the non-White’s form of “road kill.”
HUNTSVILLE, Texas (AP) — A Mexican national was executed Thursday for the rape-slaying of a teenager after the U.S. Supreme Court turned down an appeal to spare him that was supported by Mexico and the White House.

In his last minutes, Humberto Leal repeatedly said he was sorry and accepted responsibility.

“I have hurt a lot of people. … I take full blame for everything. I am sorry for what I did,” he said in the death chamber.

“One more thing,” he said as the drugs began taking effect. Then he shouted twice, “Viva Mexico!”

“Ready warden,” he said. “Let’s get this show on the road.”

The 38-year-old mechanic was pronounced dead 10 minutes after the lethal drugs began flowing into his arms.

He was sentenced to death for the 1994 murder of 16-year-old Adria Sauceda, whose brutalized nude body was found hours after he left a San Antonio street party with her. She was bludgeoned with a chunk of asphalt.

Leal was just a toddler when he and his family moved to the U.S. from Monterrey, Mexico, but his citizenship became a key element of his attorneys’ efforts to win a stay. They said police never told him following his arrest that he could seek legal assistance from the Mexican government under an international treaty.

Mexico, the Obama administration and others had asked the U.S. Supreme Court to delay Leal’s execution so Congress could consider a law that would require court reviews in cases where condemned foreign nationals did not receive help from their consulates. They said the case could affect not only foreigners in the U.S. but Americans detained in other countries.

The court rejected the request 5-4. Its five more conservative justices doubted that executing Leal would cause grave international consequences, and doubted “that it is ever appropriate to stay a lower court judgment in light of unenacted legislation.”

“Our task is to rule on what the law is, not what it might eventually be,” the majority said.

The court’s four liberal-leaning justices said they would have granted the stay.

Leal’s attorney Sandra L. Babcock said that with consular help her client could have shown that he was not guilty. But she added, “This case was not just about one Mexican national on death row in Texas. The execution of Mr. Leal violates the United States’ treaty commitments, threatens the nation’s foreign policy interests, and undermines the safety of all Americans abroad.”

Prosecutors, however, said Congress was unlikely to pass the legislation sought and that Leal’s appeals were simply an attempt to evade justice for a gruesome murder.

Mexico’s foreign ministry said in a statement that the government condemned Leal’s execution and sent a note of protest to the U.S. State Department. The ministry also said Mexican ambassador Arturo Sarukhan attempted to contact Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who refused to speak on the phone.

The governor’s office declined to comment on the execution Thursday.

Leal’s argument that he should have received consular legal aid that could have helped his case was not new. Texas has executed other condemned foreign nationals who raised similar challenges, most recently in 2008.

Leal’s appeals, however, focused on legislation introduced last month in the U.S. Senate by Vermont Democrat Patrick Leahy. Leahy’s measure would bring the U.S. into compliance with the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations provision regarding the arrests of foreign nationals, and ensure court reviews for condemned foreigners to determine if a lack of consular help made a significant difference in the outcome of their cases.

“Americans detained overseas rely on their access to U.S. consulates every day,” Leahy said after the Supreme Court decision was announced. “If we expect other countries to abide by the treaties they join, the United States must also honor its obligations.”

The Obama administration took the unusual step of intervening in a state murder case last week when Solicitor General Donald Verrilli Jr. joined Leal’s appeal, asking the high court to halt the execution and give Congress at least six months to consider Leahy’s bill.

The Mexican government and other diplomats also contended that the execution should be delayed so Leal’s case could be thoroughly reviewed. Some also warned his execution would violate the treaty provision and could endanger Americans in countries that deny them consular help.

Measures similar to Leahy’s have failed at least twice in recent U.S. congressional sessions. The Texas Attorney General’s office, opposing the appeals, pointed to those failures in its Supreme Court arguments and said “legislative relief was not likely to be forthcoming.”

After his execution, relatives of Leal who had gathered in Guadalupe, Mexico, burned a T-shirt with an image of the American flag in protest. Leal’s uncle Alberto Leal criticized the U.S. justice system and the Mexican government and said, “There is a God who makes us all pay.”

In 2005, President George W. Bush agreed with an International Court of Justice ruling that Leal and 50 other Mexican-born inmates nationwide should be entitled to new hearings in U.S. courts to determine if their consular rights were violated. The Supreme Court later overruled Bush.

Stephen Hoffman, an assistant Texas attorney general, said evidence pointing to Leal’s guilt is strong.

“At this point, it is clear that Leal is attempting to avoid execution by overwhelming the state and the courts with as many meritless lawsuits and motions as humanly possible,” Hoffman said.

Prosecutors said Sauceda was drunk and high on cocaine the night she was killed, and that Leal offered to take her home. Witnesses said Leal drove off with her around 5 a.m. Some partygoers found her brutalized nude body later that morning and called police.

Sauceda’s mother, Rachel Terry, told San Antonio television station KSAT her family already had suffered too long.

“A technicality doesn’t give anyone a right to come to this country and rape, torture and murder anyone,” she said.

___

Associated Press Writer Jesse J. Holland in Washington contributed to this report.

Link